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Swix Zero Spray Alternative?

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  tradesmith45 2 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #89651

    D. Diehl
    Participant

    Has anyone had success with any product besides Swix Zero spray for keeping the kick zone from icing on the Fischer Zero or the Rossi rubber model? Since the Swix spray is $80 I perfer using it on race days. I remember Swix had a “Haries Kit” back in the 80′s. It came with an abrader and a bottle of this very thick liquid most likely silicone based material. I had this but lost it. My thought is to buy a cheap spray bottle of silcone spray for leather products like for boots. I would think my Toko Helix would work to but once again looking for something economical for training days when Zero’s rule like yesterday in the Adirondacks. If you have had any luck with another product which is cheaper than the Zero spray I would appreciate hearing about it. Thanks.

    #91114

    Retsalb
    Participant

    Toko makes a pretty cheap version of their silicone spray. That works well for training.

    #91115

    tradesmith45
    Member

    Thanks,

    I don’t know of a Toko silicone spray. What is it called?

    #91116

    tradesmith45
    Member

    D. Deal,

    Have you tried the Swix spray and found it works?

    I was told by a wax tech that they tried all kinds of clothing & shoe silicone sprays during the Olympics. There were no superior products. They also tried a clothing fluoro spray Tectron. Haven’t tried it.

    Some have also had success w/ rubbing a HF glide wax on lightly. Haven’t tried this either.

    So far, I’ve found a couple things that will work for a couple K before icing but that’s it.

    I’m still looking for something that will work in the wet PNW. But then Swix VR40 & VR30 both iced up at a recent race w/ snow temps @ -5C to -7C & very wet snow.

    #91117

    imnxcguy
    Member

    Swix makes a Zero 70 Spray which is a lot cheaper, and isn’t fluoro-based. My impression is that it works, but just not for as long, so it’s definitely worth your looking into.

    #91118

    D. Diehl
    Participant

    I also looked for a Toko Silicone spray and found nothing after this suggestion. I will look into the Swix Zero 70 Spray. Thanks.

    #91119

    tradesmith45
    Member

    Here in the PNW Swix Zero 70 Spray has not worked & will ice on demanding days. Fresh sun warmed snow on top of cold is the worst.

    70 Might work where snow is a bit dryer or no sun. Zardoz has been successful in the past too but failed during the really difficult conditions this year – wears off too fast.

    There is a Toko silicone spray for lubing alpine bindings but its not on their web page. But Toko’s Fluoro Irox spray has worked ok for some on Zeros & is about the same price as Zero 70.

    Here’s a couple tips that will help regardless of what you use. The kick zone has to be COMPLETELY dry before applying anti-icing compounds. I’ve seen icing occur in just the spot where a snow flake fell on the base before I applied Zardoz.

    Corking even a spray fluoro compound you’ve applied to the kick zone seems to help spread the material into the base & reduce icing. If a spray leaves any residue (even some pure fluoros will), it will be helpful to nylon brush up the base hairs before skiing. Some silicones collect dirt & leave a gummy mess that can really reduce kick.

    Still searching.

    #91120

    tradesmith45
    Member

    BTW a reguylar Zero user tells me he has had the most success w/ either the $80 Swix or Toko Helx & they both worked the same. But even those have failed him on really difficult days.

    #91121

    natron
    Member

    I’ve used SkiGo C22 liquid with success and also Rex Hydrex liquid, although Hydrex does not seem to have as much durability. The Hydrex is also a great additive on hard wax. Of course, both can be used as liquid glide waxes as well.

    On training days, there is the cheaper Swix Zero spray, or you could also use Silicone spray that you get at the hardware store. But as others have said, you might have trouble on those tricky days.

    #91122

    tradesmith45
    Member

    We continue to have challenging snow conditions that produce icing here in the PNW. At a recent race w/ falling high mositure snow at temps of -5C, thin Swix VR40 & VR30 both iced. Rode Sp. Green was great.

    Got a chance to test Swix fluoro Zero spray on another tough day. It worked better than anything else out that day.

    The day had high moisture snow as usual. A new storm on the tail of the last one was producing warm over fresh cold snow. Air temp -4C w/ high winds, snow temp ranged from -8c to -3C. Another skier on a thin layer of Toko blue over green that had worked well in the a.m. was icing by mid-day. A skier on scale touring skis was icing. My Atomic-multi Zeros were gliding a bit better than the Toko & gripped well. When the sun popped out for a couple minutes & warmed the snow more, the Zeros would ice a bit but clear quickly.

    The Swix gave me usable but not great skis. One of the Rode blue kickers would likely have been much better but I did not have time to test. Skied about 10K before ran out of time & the Swix lasted. If you are a die hard Zero skier, $80 seems like a cheap ticket to good skiing on tough days.

    I’ll continue testing alternatives when i have time.

    #91123

    T.Eastman
    Participant

    Tradesmithy, some icing is inevitable in coastal conditions. It sounds to me that your ski selection may be part of the issue. Stiffer skis will help when skis are going through the icing/clearing deal. The stiffer skis are less tolerant of technique errors but can help. If you don’t have a pair of stiff hard wax skis, use some klister skis, wax a bit thicker, and see what happens.

    Where are you skiing? There are big differences between say, Cypress and the WOP, and one brand that works well at one area often is a poor performer at the other.

    The zeros can be given a range of sandings or roughening to fix the grip in addition to the fluid treatments.

    Keep on testing!

    #91124

    tradesmith45
    Member

    As usual T, you have added great experience to this discussion. Thanks. Correct flex may be even more critical to performance w/ Zeros. A Zero that keeps the kick zone off the snow w/ 50% of your weight could still have poor glide while striding w/ your weight more on the front of the foot.

    I’m skiing both sides of the Cascades in Oregon. Most years there are big differences between West & East sides but not so much this year. Most years, we get several real 32F & snowing days but not this year. I’m hopeful that icing is much less of a problem in zero conditions.

    All the test results & comments I’ve posted on this thread have been based on multiple skiers as well as myself. Most days, several pair of Zeros from Fischer, Salomon, Madshus & my Atomics were in use and several waxed skis.

    And all of my testing is really unfair! Because Zeros were never designed for these colder/mixed snow temp conditions. Some people continue to claim Zero skis can be your daily driver so that’s why I’ve been doing this.

    Picked up the Atomic-Multis cheap, used from a friend to learn more about Zeros. Their design is problematic though they are the right flex for me. The kick material is 65 cm so I have hot waxed them down to 55cm. Newer Zeros are 45 or 55cm. As you suggest, I’ve adjusted the tuning on them several times. Zeros definitely take a fair amount of time to tune to get their best performance.

    So far, my tentative conclusion is Zeros could be a daily driver only if you are willing to accept weak performance in most common conditions & spend lots of time/money to get it. In every shoot out I’ve done in these colder mixed conditions, a waxed ski out performed the Zeros by lots & took less time (thank god for Rode). In all old snow conditions including klister & some warmer new snow, Rex Tapegrip out performed Zeros!

    If you want easy, Rex Tapegrip could be a cheap 1 wax solution for a whole spring depending on your snow. But it will ice in cold/wet new snow below about -2 to -4C even if covered w/ a fast hard wax like Rode Multi-blue.

    That said, I have NO conclusions about Zero skis at 0C. And there are new Zero materials coming including the impressive Skintecs. So I’m hopeful.

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