HomeTag science

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/03/Mar10guns.jpg

This winter, three teams of researchers investigated attitudes towards climate change within the ski industry. They found huge cultural differences between how Austrians, Finns, and New Zealanders perceived the threat - with the Austrian industry having no adaptation strategy, while New Zealand is ramping up snowmaking - as well as between CEO's and the skiers themselves.

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/05/explosion.jpg

This month, the Journal of Applied physiology confronted allegations of scientific misconduct in two cases: one when a study used an athlete who turned out to have been doping, and another when researchers asked participants to use banned methods. The journal invited discussion from many of the scientists involved as well as WADA, with interesting, and antagonistic, results.

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/03/527793_10151535854499925_1225092209_n.jpg

Nordic sports are pretty egalitarian, as far as athletics go - but women are still confronted, constantly, with stereotypes about what is and is not appropriate or possible for them to do. In southern France, two researchers are focusing on what effects these stereotypes have on women's participation and performance in a wide range of sports, and explained their findings in an interview.

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/12/pow_logo.png

A recent report published by Protect Our Winters and the Natural Resources placed an economic value on climate change: for the winter sports and tourism industry, a billion dollars of revenue have been lost in bad snow years in the last decade, and a bad season means a six percent drop in employment compared to a good one. Yet the industry hasn't taken action.

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/10/Screen-Shot-2012-10-26-at-6.44.52-AM.png

FasterSkier is starting a once-a-month series looking at new research in the field of sports science. Periodically, we’ll flip through some of the world’s best peer-reviewed medical journals and summarize, in plain English, studies that we think will be of interest to skiers. Here’s our second installment; you can check out the first in a recent paper in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. “The pathophysiology of the condition is poorly understood,...

https://fasterskier.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/09/Fake-blood.jpg

FasterSkier is starting a new, once-a-month series looking at new research in the field of sports science. Periodically, we’ll flip through some of the world’s best peer-reviewed medical journals and summarize, in plain English, studies that we think will be of interest to skiers. Here’s our first installment – enjoy! * Those dopers who claim that their blood measurements were funny because they just did a really hard workout might actually have a point. A...

When racers like Therese Johaug and Ivan Babikov reach the final day of the Tour de Ski, their bodies are already exhausted from day after day of racing. Their legs are tired, are they’re not alone: a recent study found that some aspects of heart function can not only decline, but remain suppressed after several days of consecutive races. But thanks to the human body’s remarkable ability to adapt to repeated stress, Johaug, Babikov, and...

At Polish three time overall World Cup champion Justyna Kowalczyk has never been one to keep her mouth shut. Take, for example, her accusation that Marit Bjoergen’s asthma medicine is performance-enhancing. “Without the medicine Marit would not have won gold medals,” Kowalczyk said at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver. If Bjoergen has asthma, then it may very well be true. But Kowalczyk’s implication was that either Bjoergen did not have asthma and was taking the...